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LAYER, LAYER, LAYER...............

Successful interior design is all about getting each of the elements in a room to work well together while still standing out and making an individual impact. One of the ways to do this is through a process called layering.

If you really want to take your interior to the next level, hopefully we can suggest how to effectively incorporate layering into your home. The difference will be apparent immediately.

 

Having worked in the fashion industry for 25 years I have long been aware of how designers use layering to make an collections more dynamic. The addition of a accessories, scarves or jewellery is ultimately what personalises a look and takes it from utilitarian to something really special.

 

Interior design works in much the same way. Take time to consider all of the separate elements that go into pulling a room together. While each of these elements play their own role, the design only comes to life once they all work together.

 

Layering is the act of building the room from the ground up. It’s about taking each of those individual design elements and pulling them together to form a cohesive look. It’s the special ingredient that adds depth to a room and makes it extraordinary.

Incorporate levels of contrast in your design; not only does this help make each design element stand out more clearly, it also makes the room more interesting.

 

Some examples of successful layering:

  • Colours: Choose opposite shades of the spectrum

  • Patterns: Pair a bold design with a solid colour

  • Materials: Contrast metals with natural materials

  • Lighting: Consider lighting from more than one source. Combine top light with ambient sources

  • Textures: Juxtapose hard and soft or rough and smooth

  • Size: Group large and small items together and experiment with asymmetry

It is worth the effort because it really does work!

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